Tag Archives: Women’s judo

Week one in pictures…

Week one of the summer block of the EJU level 4 performance coach award is complete! Here are some pictures, the students are going down to the British Judo Performance Institute today for the test fights and overload training of the British Olympic team.

Some pictures of the Strength and Conditioning module delivered at Core-Cambridge, more photo’s of this soon. Also our biomechanics preparation lectures, physiology practical sessions and mat based sessions with world and Olympic champion Maki Tsukada.

 

Week two is just as packed!!

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo

Karina Bryant Wins Bronze at Europeans

It’s taken a week and a half but I couldn’t let Karina’s bronze medal at the Europeans past without a post.

The Europeans were in Chelyabinks and Great Britain Sent 21 athletes, only one medalled – Karina Bryant. Sarah Clark and Sally Conway came 5th and 7th respectively.

It should be noted UK sport base their funding on Olympic, World and European medals. The funding is based upon potential to deliver at an Olympic games and this is derived from the World and European medals (of course there are other criteria). Funding for an Olympic cycle is therefore based upon performance in the previous cycle i.e. 2008-2012 funding was based upon our 2004-2008 performance in OG, worlds and Europeans. We should look at these and the ones through this present Olympic cycle.

2005 Euro – GBR won, 1G, 2S and 1B

2005 Worlds – GBR won 1G & 2S.

Of these 2005 medal Karina won gold at the Europeans and 2 of the silvers at the worlds

2006 Euro – GBR 2G and 2B (Karina came 7th)

2007 Euro – GBR 2B

2007 Worlds –  1S & 1B

2008 Euro – No medal

2008 Olympic Games – No medal

2009 Euro – 1S

2009 Worlds – 1S

Both of these silvers were Karina and the woman she lost to in the final of the worlds was later found to test positive for drugs.

2010 Euro – GBR 2B

2010 worlds – 1B

One of the Bronze at the Europeans was Karina

2011 Euro – 2B

2011 Worlds – No medals (Karina came 7th)

2012 Euro –  1B (Karina)

Therefore we can say that over the last two Olympic cycles GBR has won 21 medals and 7 of these were Karina Bryant. I think the only other players in the last ten years to consistently win medals at world and European level are Euan Burton and Craig Fallon.

Surely then we can argue that much of the high performance funding GBR has seen for this Olympic cycle (£7.9m) and probably the next is due to Karina Bryant despite being  injured for much of the 10 years.

The reason I wanted to write this post is twofold. Firstly I think British judo owes a great debt to Karina and she should be given huge respect for this. Secondly, in my opinion, Karina’s bronze medal fight in Chelyabinks is the best I have ever seen her, she is strong, has great judo and hopefully ready for London!

Here is Karina’s bronze medal fight

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Second week of the EJU coaching awards – Easter block

Following on from my previous post  we have just completed the second week of the Easter block of the European Judo Union Level 4 coaching award. This week we also had some amazing guest lecturers.

On Monday we had the current performance director of British judo and Former world champion Daniel Lascau (7th Dan). He took the students through nage no kata explaining how coaches need to understand the underlying principles of judo in order to improve performance.

Wednesday we were joined by world and Olympic champion Maki Tsukada, she presented in the classroom on the talent development system at Tokai university before taking a mat session at Comberton judo club open to all players in the area, including juniors. There were around 70 people on the mat!

On Thursday we had double european and world champion Loretta Cusack (7th Dan). In her first session she explained how coaches can use drills to move their students from technique to skill; in her second session she presented on some of the difference between male and female judoka, she highlighted things coaches should be aware of when coaching females.

Throughout the week we Hatsuyuki Hamada (8th Dan) with us, he took many many sessions for us. Many people reading this would not have heard of Hatsuyuki Hamada, he was  the Japanese national coach for the Atlanta Olympic games and the personal coach of Ryoko Tani (7 x world champion and 2 x Olympic champion). Hamada sensei took too many sessions to discuss in one blog, his sessions were amazing and very good fun. On Wednesday he travelled to Dartford to see the England training camp as some of the players had previously met Hamada sensei not heir trip to Japan.

An absolutely fantastic two weeks that had a good balance of academic study and mat based sessions. I will try to post some more photos later. There is more information on this world leading coaching program run by Anglia Ruskin University for the European Judo Union at www.anglia.ac.uk/judo.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, Comberton Judo Club, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, Women's judo

Heading out to Paris

Saturday I will be heading out to Paris for the 7th International Association of Judo Researchers symposium. The event is looking good with presentations that cover a wide variety of topics.

The history of Dan system for female Judo
Presenter: Associate Professor Noriko Mizoguchi. Shizuoka University of Art and Culture. Japan

Gunji Koizumi
Presenter: Dr Mike Callan. Anglia Ruskin University. England

History of International Judo
Presenter: Professor Michel Brousse. l’Université de Bordeaux 2. France

Dr Shigeyoshi Matsumae
Presenter: Professor Yasuhiro Yamashita. Tokai University. Japan

Disabled people and the Potential of Judo
Presenter: Professor Takeshi Nakajima. Kokushikan University. Japan

Specific Exercise Testing in judo athletes
Presenter: Ms Elena Pocecco. University of Innsbruck. Austria

Modelling judo grip contest and simulations
Presenter: Professor Michel Calmet. Université de Montpellier 1. France

The performance of Explosive Muscular Actions of the Lower Body in Judo Athletes

Presenter: Professor Luis Montiero. Lusofona University. Portugal.

There will also be around 30 poster presentations. Anglia Ruskin has representation in the presentations from Dr Mike Callan and two posters, one from me and one from Janaina Magalhaes, who is a student on the EJU level 4 coaching award. Janaina is presenting on ‘O Soto Gari: the Role of Renrakukuwazas to this Major Throw’ and I am presenting ‘A temporal Analysis of the u48kg Women’s Judo at the 2010 World Championships’.

I’ll write more about the conference and, of course, the world championships when I am in Paris 🙂

 

If there are any of the presentations you’re particularly interested in let me know by commenting below and i’ll blog as much info as I can.

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Is womens judo on the brink of evolutionary change?

In 1991 there was a major shift in the world of judo. The former soviet union collapsed and became 15 countries instead of one. This meant that on the world stage you now potentially had 15 former soviet countries rather than one per weight group. It should be noted that these soviet or URS countries were not all the Eastern European countries, it did not include Romania, Hungary, Poland or Bulgaria for example. It did, however, include some now major judo nations, including: Russia, Georgia, Ukraine, Belarus, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. We should also remember that there was an influx of Chechen wrestlers/judo players to Turkey and Georgian wrestlers/judo players to Greece.

In the 1992 Olympic games only three of the former Soviet countries competed under their own flag (Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia) the remainder competed under a unified team. The second big change in the 1992 Olympic games was the inclusion of women’s judo. Some countries have hugely benefited from the inclusion of women’s judo, particularly Great Britain, Japan, Cuba and France but the former soviet countries have had little influence in women’s judo. Sure you have Eastern Europeans, Romanians, Hungarians and Polish but not many former Soviet countries.  The world Championships has seen a rise in Eastern Europeans from Romania, Poland and Hungary, Romaina in particular is winning multiple medals on the world stage.

We could argue however the changes are coming, the video below shows Arutiunyanfrom Armenia throwing with a huge Te-Guruma in the 2010 world championships in the u48kg weight group. In fact the 2010 world championships saw Romania, Mongolia, Azerbaijan, Russia (x 2) and Slovenia win a bronze, Hungary won a silver and there were 5 & 7th places for Hungary, Ukraine, Mongolia (x3), Russia and Poland. I would happily predict Mongolia and Romania as serious medal contenders for London 2012!

So, where can this assumption of a rise in Eastern European women’s judo lead us? If we look at mens judo – 31 men from former soviet union countries have won Olympic medals since 1992 Olympics and only two women from former soviet union countries (both Russia). You add the sudden increase of former Soviet union countries and the existing Eastern European countries rise in medals to the Olympic stage and this could spell trouble for the current countries who do well in women’s judo such as Cuba, France and Japan.

The question is this, how well prepared are the worlds elite women for this shift? Countries like Mongolia and Armenia are sending women judo players who have a style most women judoka are not used too!

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Filed under Coach Education, Coaching Judo, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, PhD, Women's judo