Tag Archives: Anglia Ruskin University

Some pics from BUCS….

Here are some pics from last weekends BUCS, more to follow soon….

 

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Judo programme, Judo

New Research Assistant at Anglia Ruskin

We now have a new research assistant at Anglia Ruskin, Natasha Collins, who will focus on performance analysis in judo.

Physiology during judo contest - Lactate testing and heart rate

Physiology during judo contest – Lactate testing and heart rate

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Natasha was originally an undergraduate at Leeds metropolitan university and then transferred to Anglia Ruskin for her final year to train as a full-time judo player. Her undergraduate dissertation focussed on time motion analysis and kumi-kata in British judo and compared juniors to seniors. This has subsequently be edited for publication and is currently being peer reviewed.

She will support a variety of research topics including the coach-athlete relationship, LTAD and athlete monitoring but her main focus will be performance analysis in judo. This will support my PhD work and the work of Glenn Miller.

Natasha will also continue to work as the judo programme administrator and one of our AASE coaches.

Anglia Ruskin has a thriving judo research group that collaborates with academics around the world. We currently have around 10-15 members of staff focussing on judo research including performance analysis, physiology, coaching, the history of judo, child protection in judo and many other topics as well as three PhD students currently focussing on judo topics. The number of PhD students will hopefully increase this year.

Here are some of our research pics…

If you would like more information on the judo research group or the judo programme at Anglia Ruskin University please visit http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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Some pictures from the last two week block of the European Judo Union L4 coach award

Here are  some pictures from the last block of the European Judo Union Level 4 performance award…..

Guest lecturers included Darren Warner, Neil Adams, Danial Lascau, Deborah Gravenstijn, Maki Tsukada, Ikumi Tanimoto, Mike Stocker (EIS) and the General Secretary of the EJU Envic Galea. Modules taught include performance analysis for judo, physiology for judo, Sports development and talent development pathways.

 

 

There is more information on this course at the Anglia Ruskin University judo pages – http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo

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Do judo coaches need to know about physiology?

On the next block of the EJU level 4 performance coach award the first year group will study physiology. When I was writing this course I constantly asked myself what do coaches need to know? Based upon my previous experiences as a coach, my academic knowledge and the literature on coaching knowledge I developed the model below, I probably read it somewhere and adapted it or maybe put several things I’d read together, I really can’t remember.

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Image taken from one of my powerpoint lectures

I think coaches can learn a lot from experience and reflection but I also think if they have an underpinning knowledge of the science this reflective process of learning can be much faster and more economical. As you can see in the figure above I have added sources to the types of knowledge a coach needs and the sciences generally come from universities.

When I did my first degree, which was in sports science, I had a biomechanics lecturer who always used to say “you cannot change the laws of the universe” and of course he is correct, for example we cannot change gravity but we can manipulate it’s affect if we understand it, take the fosbery flop for example!

So do judo coaches need to understand physiology? Well just like the “laws of the universe” you cannot change physiology but you can manipulate and you can gain huge advantages. In his speech in the film ‘any given Sunday’ Al Pacino says the game is “all about inches” and “taking the inches”. I think judo is the same, every inch matters and you can gain these performance inches in many ways – technical, tactical, psychological etc but also physiologically.

I am not suggesting coaches should be physiologist but lets be honest – they write the “periodised year plan” and most have no idea about the underlying physiology. In some countries they do, Germany, Russia, China and France for example. So if coaches don’t need to be physiologist how much physiology do they need to know? Well, in my opinion, they need to be able to understand physiological test results and apply them to their year plan, they need to be able to interact with the S&C coaches/doctor/physio etc but most importantly they need to understand the physiological demands of the sport so they can apply them to their mat sessions!

Can you honestly say you fully understand the physiological demands of judo? How much lactate would you expect your players to produce in randori? In shiai? How can you test recovery in the taper? Do you sessions mimic the physiological demands of shiai? How can you improve your athletes recovery?

Here are some pictures of our coaches developing their physiology knowledge so that their players can win their fights inch by inch.

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BUCS training 2013

Well it has been too long since I last posted. The last couple of months have been very hectic, firstly there was marking to do over xmas, then preparations for the British trials and then preparations for the British University and Colleges championships (BUCS). It is the latter I am blogging about.

BUCS is an amazing event, previously they have had 29 sports over one week, normally in Sheffield. This year is slightly different as they have split it into team sports and individual sports with the judo being over the weekend of the 23rd/24th Feb. The judo has individuals on the Saturday and a team event on the Sunday (males teams of 5 and female teams of 3).

For the previous two year Anglia Ruskin University has won the men’s team event and last year topped the medal table overall. This year our training has been far more intense and structured, our team is also much larger as for the first time we are including a substantial number of kyu grades. 

The pre training hasn’t been without its hazards and I have lost two of our strongest players, in fact we’re now four very strong players down (Danny Williams, Mike Stewart, Glenn Miller and Natasha Collins). Of course we still have a strong team and we’ll just have to see how it goes.

Our pre training has been four weeks long (six weeks for those that went to the British trials and those that helped them prepare) with the final week for rest (rest started yesterday). Numbers are good, we normally have between 25-30 on the mat.

Not wanting to make the post too long i’ll pause for now and reflect upon our actual training in my next post……

 

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Week one in pictures…

Week one of the summer block of the EJU level 4 performance coach award is complete! Here are some pictures, the students are going down to the British Judo Performance Institute today for the test fights and overload training of the British Olympic team.

Some pictures of the Strength and Conditioning module delivered at Core-Cambridge, more photo’s of this soon. Also our biomechanics preparation lectures, physiology practical sessions and mat based sessions with world and Olympic champion Maki Tsukada.

 

Week two is just as packed!!

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo

The summer block has started….

Monday saw the start of the summer block of the European Judo Union Level 4 performance coach award.

As explained in my previous post there are 4 modules – year one are predominantly doing physiology, year two are doing biomechanics and Strength & Conditioning.

 

Today has seen our first years looking at EMG and our second years doing strength and conditioning. There was also a keynote session by world and Olympic champion Maki Tsukada (JPN)

Here are some photos from so far….

 

 

 

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