Category Archives: Women’s judo

Just a very short post about GB’s performance in Paris 2016

I thought I would just write a quick posted as I haven’t posted for a very long time. Team GB sent 12 players to Paris this weekend to fight in the Grand slam. I think hat firstly, sending 12 players is great, it is a definite step up from previous years.

In terms of performance, well this is the first time we have won  medal since we moved to a centralised system around 2009. In fact out last medallist in the Paris Grand slam was Euan Burton in 2008. This time round Sally Conway won Bronze in the -70kg and Natalie Powell won Bronze when she beat Gemma Gibbons in the -78kg. This is a good result, two bronzes and a 5th.

Of course there is a long way to go, of the 12 players we sent most went out in the first or second fight and I think we should be pushing for most players to finish with at least 2-3 wins but if we look at where we have been for many years, think this is a great result and we should be very happy, also sometimes this is just judo, you can’t win them all and many of the players were more than capable of winning a medal on the right day.

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There is of course a little controversy! Philip Awiti being disqualified for a leg grad during transition. I am not going to say anything about this now, I am going to try and write a post later this week.

So for now that’s it, I really just wanted to say well done congratulation to all those who medalled and just a shout out to all the GB judo community really. The next Open National Squad Training is in April and this is part of the final prep for the Europeans. If you’re a dan grade that competes then I think you should be there. Our athletes need to train hard with a variety of players, at the last ONST we had maybe about 150 players which is great but we should have more.

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Filed under British Judo, Judo, Uncategorized, Women's judo

New Research Assistant at Anglia Ruskin

We now have a new research assistant at Anglia Ruskin, Natasha Collins, who will focus on performance analysis in judo.

Physiology during judo contest - Lactate testing and heart rate

Physiology during judo contest – Lactate testing and heart rate

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Natasha was originally an undergraduate at Leeds metropolitan university and then transferred to Anglia Ruskin for her final year to train as a full-time judo player. Her undergraduate dissertation focussed on time motion analysis and kumi-kata in British judo and compared juniors to seniors. This has subsequently be edited for publication and is currently being peer reviewed.

She will support a variety of research topics including the coach-athlete relationship, LTAD and athlete monitoring but her main focus will be performance analysis in judo. This will support my PhD work and the work of Glenn Miller.

Natasha will also continue to work as the judo programme administrator and one of our AASE coaches.

Anglia Ruskin has a thriving judo research group that collaborates with academics around the world. We currently have around 10-15 members of staff focussing on judo research including performance analysis, physiology, coaching, the history of judo, child protection in judo and many other topics as well as three PhD students currently focussing on judo topics. The number of PhD students will hopefully increase this year.

Here are some of our research pics…

If you would like more information on the judo research group or the judo programme at Anglia Ruskin University please visit http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo programme, Judo, PhD, Women's judo

Pre BUCS preparation…

I said I would blog about our pre-training and I wanted to do it before BUCS because I feel reflecting upon the training once you know the result sometimes affects you opinion but I can only do what time allows.

I would say I am very experienced in short term preparation for specific competitions. When I competed for the army it was common to have a 2-3 week intense preparation period for a specific competition and since these competitive days I have coached the army and combined services in a similar scenario, often for the combined services championships or the national team championships.

This year was slightly different in terms of our BUCS preparation. Firstly I now work with a group of full-time athletes, the train around 20hrs per week so their level of preparation is very different. Secondly BUCS was brought forward by two weeks to the end of Feb, whilst this doesn’t sound like much students generally do not return to campus until the end of Jan so that only really left about 4 weeks to prepare for some students. Most of the full-time players did return earlier though in order to prepare for the British trials and some local players train with us regularly.

When I designed the original plan it was very much around the full-time players so there was around 6 weeks of training prior to BUCS and I figured if the kyu grades dipped in and out of the training as much as they could then this would be more training than most kyu grades.

Inevitably things change though and the number of injuries meant I had to include the kyu grades more and more. To be honest I am surprised how much the managed.

Here is the overview of the training:

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To be honest there is no real secret, for me it is about mat time and volume of randori. I get as many dojo sessions as possible and just increase the volume of randori each each microcycle. I use both 7 day and 14 day microcycles in order to achieve volume, intensity and rest. The preparation ended in an overload week – the aim was for athletes to achieve 60-72 randori’s in the week. The most we did in one session was 13 x 5mins, I nearly always use 2 minute rest periods for hard randori, this is something I have experimented with a lot and I find after about 90 sec players are ready to go again and facing their partner, this leave 30 sec with them thinking ‘come on, i’m ready’ and this means they seem to always feel like they can do more.

Here is an example of a microcycle:

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I am fortunate enough to now be surrounded by some coaches and athletes who can challenge my thinking and during the overload week I was challenged by a few coaches who thought we were doing too much and people were too tired. I like to be challenged like this, it forces me to really reflect, a very deep and questioning reflection. I decided to persist, I expected more players to be struggling than were and although there was some emotion it just felt right to me. I have already thought about how I will change things for next year based on a conversation with Yasuke Hayashi (a Japanese judoka visiting us).

Anyway, this post is getting far too long! Next post i’ll talk about the competition itself 🙂

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Judo Scholarships at Anglia Ruskin

Anglia Ruskin University has confirmed that ten judo players will receive scholarships this year. The players, listed below, are a mix of players who train full-time at the university and players that are part-time students on the European Judo Union level 4 performance coach award.

Seven of the athletes train full-time at the Anglia Ruskin Cambridge campus, two of the the EJU coaching award and one studies at University campus Peterborough.

Name Year Course Results
Michael Stewart 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education Club president, Current BUCS champion u66kg, member of BUCS winning mens team 2011 & 2012
Glenn Miller 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Science Member of BUCS winning mens team 2011 & 2012
Natasha Collins 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education BUCS silver medallist
Matt Kavannagh 1st BA (Hons) Law Current British junior champion
Tara Fitzjohn 1st BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education
Luc Bonnargent 1st BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education
Ronnie Plumb 1st BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education
Danny Williams 2nd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching (European Judo Union) Selected to represent Team GB in London 2012
Adrian Markov 2nd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching (European Judo Union) Current BUCS champion u81kg, member of BUCS winning mens team 2012
Josh Plant 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education Studies at University college Peterborough. Member of BUCS winning mens team 2011 & 2012

As well as scholarships all players will receive physiological testing, strength and conditioning, access to performance analysis, free gym access and two fighting films judo kits.

Four of these athletes will graduate in 2013 and are currently considering a masters programme led by Anglia Ruskin in partnership with Kanoya university in Japan, they will spend half the academic year at Kanoya and half at Anglia Ruskin, Cambridge.

Anglia Ruskin University also recently announced a research group dedicated to judo research that is linked to the International Association of Judo Researchers and hopes to forge collaborations with other universities around the world to develop judo research.

For more information on the judo programme at Anglia Ruskin, which includes coach education, full-time training, research, performance analysis and more please visit www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, Coaching Judo, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, Women's judo

Second week of the EJU coaching awards – Easter block

Following on from my previous post  we have just completed the second week of the Easter block of the European Judo Union Level 4 coaching award. This week we also had some amazing guest lecturers.

On Monday we had the current performance director of British judo and Former world champion Daniel Lascau (7th Dan). He took the students through nage no kata explaining how coaches need to understand the underlying principles of judo in order to improve performance.

Wednesday we were joined by world and Olympic champion Maki Tsukada, she presented in the classroom on the talent development system at Tokai university before taking a mat session at Comberton judo club open to all players in the area, including juniors. There were around 70 people on the mat!

On Thursday we had double european and world champion Loretta Cusack (7th Dan). In her first session she explained how coaches can use drills to move their students from technique to skill; in her second session she presented on some of the difference between male and female judoka, she highlighted things coaches should be aware of when coaching females.

Throughout the week we Hatsuyuki Hamada (8th Dan) with us, he took many many sessions for us. Many people reading this would not have heard of Hatsuyuki Hamada, he was  the Japanese national coach for the Atlanta Olympic games and the personal coach of Ryoko Tani (7 x world champion and 2 x Olympic champion). Hamada sensei took too many sessions to discuss in one blog, his sessions were amazing and very good fun. On Wednesday he travelled to Dartford to see the England training camp as some of the players had previously met Hamada sensei not heir trip to Japan.

An absolutely fantastic two weeks that had a good balance of academic study and mat based sessions. I will try to post some more photos later. There is more information on this world leading coaching program run by Anglia Ruskin University for the European Judo Union at www.anglia.ac.uk/judo.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, Comberton Judo Club, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, Women's judo

Some Photos from BUCS

 

There’s more to come, we have lots of video too.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, Uncategorized, Women's judo

Another great BUCS for Anglia Ruskin Judo

This weekend was once again the British University and Colleges championships and another very successful weekend for Anglia Ruskin University. The competition is fought over two days with individual championships fought on the Saturday and the Team Championships on the Sunday.

We had a strong squad of player this year with 13 players fighting. We also had a mix of kyu grades (coloured belts) and dan grades (black belts). For the first time this year we also had female fighters. We had a very successful day with three golds, and two bronze in the dan grades and two 5ths in the kyu grades. In total we had 58 fights in the individual competition with 40 wins, 37 of which were ippon! The medallists were –

Mike Stewart u66 dan grade GOLD

Adrian Markov u81 dan grade GOLD

Andre Cojuhari +100 dan grade GOLD

Johnathon Morris u81 dan grade BRONZE (only lost to Adrian)

Janaina Magalhaes u63 dan grade BRONZE

Brian Koehn u73 kyu grade 5th

Ishmael Tappaev u73 kyu grade 5th

I think in someways we were unlucky to have all three of our u81 dan grade men to end up on the same side of the draw, if not we could have maybe got gold, silver and bronze in that weight group. This is also our first female medal ever.

The team event on the Sunday say 16 universities in the mens section. The Anglia Ruskin team was aching from having so many fights on day one (25 fights between the 5 of them) and we lost our heavy weight forcing us to put in a reserve. We also withdrew our women’s team. The team was still strong:

u66 Mike Stewart

u73-90 Glenn MIller

u73-90 Adrian Markov

u73-90 Johhny Morris

+90 Josh Plant

We fought Aberdeen, Nottingham, Birmingham, Imperial, and Herriot Watt on our way to face Oxford in the final. The scores were:

Anglia Ruskin 5 Aberdeen 0

Anglia Ruskin 4 Nottingham 1

Anglia Ruskin 5 Birmingham 0

Anglia Ruskin 5 Imperial 0

Anglia Ruskin 4 Herriot Watt 1

Anglia Ruskin 3 Oxford 1 (there was one draw)

Overall on day two the team had 29 fights and 26 wins, 21 of these were ippon.

In total over the weekend Anglia Ruskin’s 13 players had 87 fights with 66 wins. Of these 66 wins 58 were ippon. For the second year running we have run the mens team championships, this year we also topped the medal table for the individual event and we won our first women’s medal.

Our university team can only win because of the great support we have had, in particular we would like to thank the following:

Fighting Films for providing the judo kits

Unisport UK for providing the stash

Susie Chesher for booking the accommodation

The students union who provided transport and entry

Most of all we would like to thank Dr Sheila Pankhurst – Head of Department of Life Sciences for support and funding of the entire judo project.

Some photos and videos will follow soon 🙂

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, Coaching Judo, Comberton Judo Club, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, Women's judo