Category Archives: PhD

Research update

With my PhD completed, I thought it would be a good idea to have somewhere where all the research can be accessed so please see the links below if you’re interested in lightweight women’s judo.

Experimental Chapters:
There’s a few more to be peer-reviewed in the future.
Research conference posters:
Presented at the world championships in Rio de Janeiro 2013
Entire Thesis:

 

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Filed under Bob Challis, British Judo, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, Comberton Judo Club, Judo, Judobob, PhD, Women's judo

World championships 2014 – Technical observations

2014-08-29 11.08.35

This post is about the observations myself and Glenn made during our trip to the world championships in Chelyabinsk. On the last day we sat in a cafe and discussed our observation and what we feel needs to be worked on within our training group (obviously some of these have not been included). Later that day we saw a blog post by Oon Yeoh that basically said pretty much exactly the same as what we had said, non-the-less here are our observations.

Edge play

Without a doubt there were a lot of shido’s given out by players not understanding the edge rule or not being able to use the edge to their advantage. I think years ago players could hugely use the edge to their advantage and eventually this will start happening again. There has been cries by coaches and officials to “fight int he middle” and i personally think this is a little naive, what athletes should do is understand the rule and use it to gain advantages, this doesn’t necessarily mean by forcing shido, the edge is a powerful tool for gaining the correct reaction to throw your opponent.

Ura-nage

There were a lot of ura-nage variations, this happened across both genders and all weight groups. There is no evidence as to why this is happening more frequently but my guess would be that because of the new rules players are turning in for an attack when slightly more compromised than before because it is hard to dominate with the kumi-kata but this is just a guess. Obviously there is also the removal of leg grabs and maybe techniques such as te-gurma  might have been used before.

Sode-Tsuri-Komi-Goshi

This was a very common technique, not really sure why but personally i think it is because of the new rules around kumi-kata and not being able to break the grip with two hands thus athletes are breaking the grip by turning in or have the sleeve already pinned.

Uchimata sukashi

A lot of the tradition kind of uchimata sukashi where the opponent avoids the uchimata and then steps across for a harai-goshi  or  tai-otoshi  type technique. There was also a lot of what might be described as the “ride and roll” technique. I would argue this is possibly due tot he reasons outlined above.

Completing the armlock when the opponent stands up

Despite the rule changes allowing the application of a ne-waza  technique once the defender has got to their feet and ippon rarely happened once they did. I feel this is generally because athletes hadn’t really figured out yet how to maintain the ne-waza  or how to get the opponent back to the floor once they got to their feet rather than the referees not giving enough time. This was most obvious in kansetstu-waza  and in particular juji-gatame. 

Shido game

Shido has pretty much always been the highest scoring technique in modern competitive judo and the rule changes do not seem to have changed this. Obviously there are now a lot more reasons to be given shido and some players have a great understanding of the “shido game’ and can really manipulate the contest. I would say possible the best player at this is Pavia (FRA) and this is not to say she doesn’t throw big, because she does! In fact i would argue she uses the shido game to make sure she can achieve the big throws.

Referees not as strict?

I am going to get some videos to highlight this point because i think it is very important. Although the referees are strict they are nowhere as strict as many of the referees in the UK, maybe somethings are simply missed but actually a lot of the time they basing their decisions on the philosophy of the rules rather than a black and white statement in the rule book. This is a big problem for us, we do not have referees operating at this higher level and therefore the manner in which the rules are being applied is not being filtered down to the national refereeing structure. This failure by British judo to get referees at this level is affecting the entire performance of judo in the UK and our international players often end up fighting a completely different type of contest here in the UK. The rules are about creating better judo not just using shido’s  and hansoku-make  all the time.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo programme, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, PhD

New PhD student….

It is with pleasure I can announce the Anglia Ruskin Judo Research group has a new PhD student. Glenn Miller completed his undergraduate degree in Sports Sciences at Anglia Ruskin University and has decided to stay and complete an MPhil/PhD with us. Glenn came to Anglia Ruskin from Ernest Bevin Phoenix Judo club in 2010 and competed on our winning men’s team in BUCS 2011. He is currently a 2nd dan.

Illias Illiadis visits

Illias Illiadis visits – Glenn Miller on the right as you look at the picture.

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Winning BUCS team 2011 – Glenn Miller Front row

Glenn’s final year project for his undergraduate degree was “A Technical Analysis of the 2013 Junior and Senior British Championships” and this work has been summarised for publication and is currently being reviewed. His postgraduate research will follow a similar theme and will consider a technical analysis of British judo players and then compare them to their international rivals to consider where GB judoka can make performance gains.

We now have three PhD students focussing on Judo research, the other two a me and Paul Robertson who is focussing on motor learning in judo. We also have 2-3 more hoping to sign up for judo related PhDs this year. Our judo research group started in October 2012; if you would like more information on our judo research please visit http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo.

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New Research Assistant at Anglia Ruskin

We now have a new research assistant at Anglia Ruskin, Natasha Collins, who will focus on performance analysis in judo.

Physiology during judo contest - Lactate testing and heart rate

Physiology during judo contest – Lactate testing and heart rate

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Natasha was originally an undergraduate at Leeds metropolitan university and then transferred to Anglia Ruskin for her final year to train as a full-time judo player. Her undergraduate dissertation focussed on time motion analysis and kumi-kata in British judo and compared juniors to seniors. This has subsequently be edited for publication and is currently being peer reviewed.

She will support a variety of research topics including the coach-athlete relationship, LTAD and athlete monitoring but her main focus will be performance analysis in judo. This will support my PhD work and the work of Glenn Miller.

Natasha will also continue to work as the judo programme administrator and one of our AASE coaches.

Anglia Ruskin has a thriving judo research group that collaborates with academics around the world. We currently have around 10-15 members of staff focussing on judo research including performance analysis, physiology, coaching, the history of judo, child protection in judo and many other topics as well as three PhD students currently focussing on judo topics. The number of PhD students will hopefully increase this year.

Here are some of our research pics…

If you would like more information on the judo research group or the judo programme at Anglia Ruskin University please visit http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo programme, Judo, PhD, Women's judo

Living Sports Sports team of the year award….

A while ago I copy and pasted a news article about the Anglia Ruskin Judo team winning the Living sports Sports team of the year award and I started by suggesting I planned to blog with more details soon, so here are the details, a little later than expected but here they are!

The way the sports awards work is that anyone can nominate in any of the categories (athletes of year, team of the year etc) and then a panel sit and decide who should win and be runner up in each category. Living sports is multi sport and covers Cambridge and Peterborough.

The reason Living sport chose Anglia Ruskin was because of the structure of our judo programme, you see it is more than just a club, it is a judo programme that is so much more than just a club. The programme consists of six intwined elements:

  • A Judo club (recreational for beginners, recreational players, regional level players etc)
  • Full-Time training (athletes that train for 20hrs per week, usually alongside study but not always and compete at national or international level)
  • The Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence (generally 16-18yo apprentices who train around 15hrs per week alongside study)
  • Anglia Ruskin Judo research group (scholars from Anglia Ruskin and other universities who focus on judo research as well as post graduate students, this group is linked to the IAJR)
  • High Performance Coach Education (the university runs the European Judo Union level 4 and 5 coaching awards)
  • A community programme (the teaching of children from primary age to sixth form in the local area. This is soon to be expanded to include linking with clubs nationally in a type of satellite programme for mutual benefit)

So how does this win us an award? Well you could put it down to medals, we have won the men’s team competition at the British Universities and Colleges Championships for the last three consecutive years, but actually it is much more than that. It is more about the intwined nature of these elements and how these can be used as an athlete centred approach to athlete development. I will explain…..

Imagine a child starting judo in our community programme, she could learn judo throughout her life and stay within this structure regardless of whether she wishes to be a competitive or recreational judoka. If she wanted to become a competitive player at age 16 years she could train up 15hrs per week alongside her education, at 18yo she could train 20hrs per week alongside an undergraduate degree.

Whilst doing her undergraduate course and training full-time we have plenty of ways to support her. Our full-time athletes run our community programme (if they want to be involved) and we put them on a level 1 coaching course in year 1 so they can become an assistant coach, paid £10 per session. In year 2 the do their level 2 coaching award and then lead the community sessions with an assistant coach, this is paid at £20 per session. Doing this means we can ensure quality coaching and our athletes earn more money per hour than working in tesco or somewhere so it is more economical with their time.

So far we have only considered three elements, full-time training, AASE and the community programme. The others are also closely linked though. The research programme provides something after their undergraduate course (i.e. they could do post grad study or research) and more importantly it also informs what we do. Not only our own research but also following what others are doing, for example how many  British universities do you think were represented at the most recent judo research symposium in Rio? That’s correct, just one! And we presented five pieces of research there, I think more than any other single university. Our athletes all get physiological testing through the research programme.

The EJU coaching awards also help our athletes. This course has many guest lecturers including many world and Olympic champions. Our full-time athletes and AASE players get to attend these mat sessions. There is also fantastic networking on this course, we can provided training camps pretty much for free (other than the flight) in Japan, Romania, Germany, Turkey, Finland, Belgium and many more countries.

Anyway, I have waffled enough! This programme is only four years old and is growing all the time. There is more information at http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or you can email judo@anglia.ac.uk for more information. If you have any ideas on how we might strengthen the programme please add them to the comments or email us.

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Filed under AASE, Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence, Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Judo programme, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, Comberton Judo Club, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, PhD

Judo stars land Team of the Year prize

Below is a simple copy and paste from the university press release, I plan to blog about this award soon 🙂

Anglia Ruskin University’s judo team won the Team of the Year prize at the LIVING SPORT Sports Awards at a ceremony in St Ives last night.

 The awards saw talented sportsmen and women, coaches, volunteers, organisations and clubs from across Cambridgeshire celebrated. Awards were presented to 10 individuals and organisations in recognition of their successes and dedication to grassroots sport in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

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Left – right: Bob Challis, judo programme manager, Paul Banton, Managing Director at Ruddocks, Glenn Miller, judo club president.

 On presenting the Team of the Year award to Anglia Ruskin, the panel commented that the judo team’s innovative structure allows participants of all levels and ages to get involved in judo.

 Anglia Ruskin’s full-time judo athletes work within the community, coaching children in schools and sixth forms around Cambridge. They are able to pass on high-quality technical content that isn’t always available at club level.

 Bob Challis, judo programme manager, said:

“It is great to be recognised not only for performance but for all the other things we do as a team. Winning medals is great but having a structure where someone can start judo as young as five and then do judo alongside education all the way to postgraduate study is something very special. It is an amazing system and is only possible because we link with schools around Cambridge and Comberton Village College, where our large dojo is.”

 Simon Fairhall, Chief Executive of LIVING SPORT, said:

“The evening was a fantastic celebration of community sport and it was great to see so many individuals involved in sport from the entire county come together to recognise the achievements of our winners. I’d particularly like to thank all of the sponsors for their support in helping us deliver another memorable awards ceremony this year.”

Anglia Ruskin sponsored the Sports Performer with a Disability Award, which was won by triathlete Lauren Steadman.

A full list of award recipients is available on the Living Sport Website. http://www.livingsport.co.uk/our-projects/living-sport-sports-awards/2013-winners/

For more information on the judo programme at Anglia Ruskin University please visit www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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Filed under AASE, Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence, Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Judo programme, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, Comberton Judo Club, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, PhD

My 2011 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 6,600 times in 2011. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, Comberton Judo Club, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, PhD, Women's judo