Category Archives: EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards

Big changes……

Lots of people have asked me what is going on with “my job” at Anglia Ruskin so I thought it best to clarify my current position. I am a senior lecturer at Anglia Ruskin and was not employed for the judo at all, this was all something I did “as extra”.

In 2009 I started a judo club at Anglia Ruskin University, I remember telling the SU staff that I wanted it to be the best university judo team in the country and being laughed at. In 2010 the European judo union moved the performance coach awards to Anglia Ruskin with me as the course leader and this was the start of a “judo programme” that consisted of a high performance coach education pathway, full-time athletes, a community programme, the Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence, recreational judo and a judo research group. I am quite proud of what was achieved here, predominately in my own time and with no extra pay. As much as I enjoy research and coach education my real passion is in athlete development and ironically it was this part of the judo programme that would prove its eventual downfall.

I set the target of providing 20hrs of training a week and we managed this with the same support as other clubs had (often less) for a sustained period of time but eventually things change. In my time managing and coaching the athletes at Anglia Ruskin they have performed very well in the British University and Colleges Championships, the results are shown below for this –

  • 4 x mens team champions at BUCS (the only Anglia Ruskin University team to win BUCS) plus one bronze
  • Women’s team bronze
  • 10 individual dan grade gold medals
  • 3 individual dan grade silvers medals
  • 10 individual dan grade bronzes medals

Over the years thats is 288 BUCS points for Anglia Ruskin University. Add to that around 15 peer reviewed journal articles specific to judo, three judo PhD students, countless students who have attended the university because of judo, income generated and the marketing i’d say it’s not a bad job.  Still the head of sport decided he didn’t want me involved in the judo anymore, this is his choice to make and I accept that decision.

So I move on! I will stay at Anglia Ruskin as a senior lecturer, a job I have enjoyed very much over the years to be honest and the one I am actually paid for. I think it is fair to say that my club that I have run for 18 years, Comberton Judo club, has suffered over the past 5-6 years with my main focus being on the Anglia Ruskin Judo Programme and the good news is that is changing and it is changing fast! Very fast! Comberton Judo club will now provide full-time training and many of the students who previously trained within the Anglia Ruskin Judo programme have moved to train with us.

I am now more positive and more confident in the judo I can deliver than I have been for a very long time, this might be a forced change but in many ways I feel it will be for the best. I would really like to thank the coaches and athletes who have stood by me throughout this two year period – Natasha Collins, Alex Hemming, Holly Newton, Ben Caldwell and Tara Fitzjohn have been particularly affected by all of this and have been strong throughout.

I will follow this post with another one about all the changes coming on board at Comberton Judo Club in the very near future (to be honest it might take more than one post!). In the mean time I wish the Head of Active Anglia and his new Head Coach, Michael Stewart, all the best for their venture into running a full-time training programme and we’ll see you on the mat!

Soremade!

 

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Filed under AASE, Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence, Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Anglia Ruskin Judo programme, Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, British Judo, Coach Education, EJU level 4 & 5 coaching awards, Judo, Uncategorized

World championships 2014 – Technical observations

2014-08-29 11.08.35

This post is about the observations myself and Glenn made during our trip to the world championships in Chelyabinsk. On the last day we sat in a cafe and discussed our observation and what we feel needs to be worked on within our training group (obviously some of these have not been included). Later that day we saw a blog post by Oon Yeoh that basically said pretty much exactly the same as what we had said, non-the-less here are our observations.

Edge play

Without a doubt there were a lot of shido’s given out by players not understanding the edge rule or not being able to use the edge to their advantage. I think years ago players could hugely use the edge to their advantage and eventually this will start happening again. There has been cries by coaches and officials to “fight int he middle” and i personally think this is a little naive, what athletes should do is understand the rule and use it to gain advantages, this doesn’t necessarily mean by forcing shido, the edge is a powerful tool for gaining the correct reaction to throw your opponent.

Ura-nage

There were a lot of ura-nage variations, this happened across both genders and all weight groups. There is no evidence as to why this is happening more frequently but my guess would be that because of the new rules players are turning in for an attack when slightly more compromised than before because it is hard to dominate with the kumi-kata but this is just a guess. Obviously there is also the removal of leg grabs and maybe techniques such as te-gurma  might have been used before.

Sode-Tsuri-Komi-Goshi

This was a very common technique, not really sure why but personally i think it is because of the new rules around kumi-kata and not being able to break the grip with two hands thus athletes are breaking the grip by turning in or have the sleeve already pinned.

Uchimata sukashi

A lot of the tradition kind of uchimata sukashi where the opponent avoids the uchimata and then steps across for a harai-goshi  or  tai-otoshi  type technique. There was also a lot of what might be described as the “ride and roll” technique. I would argue this is possibly due tot he reasons outlined above.

Completing the armlock when the opponent stands up

Despite the rule changes allowing the application of a ne-waza  technique once the defender has got to their feet and ippon rarely happened once they did. I feel this is generally because athletes hadn’t really figured out yet how to maintain the ne-waza  or how to get the opponent back to the floor once they got to their feet rather than the referees not giving enough time. This was most obvious in kansetstu-waza  and in particular juji-gatame. 

Shido game

Shido has pretty much always been the highest scoring technique in modern competitive judo and the rule changes do not seem to have changed this. Obviously there are now a lot more reasons to be given shido and some players have a great understanding of the “shido game’ and can really manipulate the contest. I would say possible the best player at this is Pavia (FRA) and this is not to say she doesn’t throw big, because she does! In fact i would argue she uses the shido game to make sure she can achieve the big throws.

Referees not as strict?

I am going to get some videos to highlight this point because i think it is very important. Although the referees are strict they are nowhere as strict as many of the referees in the UK, maybe somethings are simply missed but actually a lot of the time they basing their decisions on the philosophy of the rules rather than a black and white statement in the rule book. This is a big problem for us, we do not have referees operating at this higher level and therefore the manner in which the rules are being applied is not being filtered down to the national refereeing structure. This failure by British judo to get referees at this level is affecting the entire performance of judo in the UK and our international players often end up fighting a completely different type of contest here in the UK. The rules are about creating better judo not just using shido’s  and hansoku-make  all the time.

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Living Sports Sports team of the year award….

A while ago I copy and pasted a news article about the Anglia Ruskin Judo team winning the Living sports Sports team of the year award and I started by suggesting I planned to blog with more details soon, so here are the details, a little later than expected but here they are!

The way the sports awards work is that anyone can nominate in any of the categories (athletes of year, team of the year etc) and then a panel sit and decide who should win and be runner up in each category. Living sports is multi sport and covers Cambridge and Peterborough.

The reason Living sport chose Anglia Ruskin was because of the structure of our judo programme, you see it is more than just a club, it is a judo programme that is so much more than just a club. The programme consists of six intwined elements:

  • A Judo club (recreational for beginners, recreational players, regional level players etc)
  • Full-Time training (athletes that train for 20hrs per week, usually alongside study but not always and compete at national or international level)
  • The Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence (generally 16-18yo apprentices who train around 15hrs per week alongside study)
  • Anglia Ruskin Judo research group (scholars from Anglia Ruskin and other universities who focus on judo research as well as post graduate students, this group is linked to the IAJR)
  • High Performance Coach Education (the university runs the European Judo Union level 4 and 5 coaching awards)
  • A community programme (the teaching of children from primary age to sixth form in the local area. This is soon to be expanded to include linking with clubs nationally in a type of satellite programme for mutual benefit)

So how does this win us an award? Well you could put it down to medals, we have won the men’s team competition at the British Universities and Colleges Championships for the last three consecutive years, but actually it is much more than that. It is more about the intwined nature of these elements and how these can be used as an athlete centred approach to athlete development. I will explain…..

Imagine a child starting judo in our community programme, she could learn judo throughout her life and stay within this structure regardless of whether she wishes to be a competitive or recreational judoka. If she wanted to become a competitive player at age 16 years she could train up 15hrs per week alongside her education, at 18yo she could train 20hrs per week alongside an undergraduate degree.

Whilst doing her undergraduate course and training full-time we have plenty of ways to support her. Our full-time athletes run our community programme (if they want to be involved) and we put them on a level 1 coaching course in year 1 so they can become an assistant coach, paid £10 per session. In year 2 the do their level 2 coaching award and then lead the community sessions with an assistant coach, this is paid at £20 per session. Doing this means we can ensure quality coaching and our athletes earn more money per hour than working in tesco or somewhere so it is more economical with their time.

So far we have only considered three elements, full-time training, AASE and the community programme. The others are also closely linked though. The research programme provides something after their undergraduate course (i.e. they could do post grad study or research) and more importantly it also informs what we do. Not only our own research but also following what others are doing, for example how many  British universities do you think were represented at the most recent judo research symposium in Rio? That’s correct, just one! And we presented five pieces of research there, I think more than any other single university. Our athletes all get physiological testing through the research programme.

The EJU coaching awards also help our athletes. This course has many guest lecturers including many world and Olympic champions. Our full-time athletes and AASE players get to attend these mat sessions. There is also fantastic networking on this course, we can provided training camps pretty much for free (other than the flight) in Japan, Romania, Germany, Turkey, Finland, Belgium and many more countries.

Anyway, I have waffled enough! This programme is only four years old and is growing all the time. There is more information at http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or you can email judo@anglia.ac.uk for more information. If you have any ideas on how we might strengthen the programme please add them to the comments or email us.

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Judo stars land Team of the Year prize

Below is a simple copy and paste from the university press release, I plan to blog about this award soon 🙂

Anglia Ruskin University’s judo team won the Team of the Year prize at the LIVING SPORT Sports Awards at a ceremony in St Ives last night.

 The awards saw talented sportsmen and women, coaches, volunteers, organisations and clubs from across Cambridgeshire celebrated. Awards were presented to 10 individuals and organisations in recognition of their successes and dedication to grassroots sport in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

SportsAwardsJudo[3]

Left – right: Bob Challis, judo programme manager, Paul Banton, Managing Director at Ruddocks, Glenn Miller, judo club president.

 On presenting the Team of the Year award to Anglia Ruskin, the panel commented that the judo team’s innovative structure allows participants of all levels and ages to get involved in judo.

 Anglia Ruskin’s full-time judo athletes work within the community, coaching children in schools and sixth forms around Cambridge. They are able to pass on high-quality technical content that isn’t always available at club level.

 Bob Challis, judo programme manager, said:

“It is great to be recognised not only for performance but for all the other things we do as a team. Winning medals is great but having a structure where someone can start judo as young as five and then do judo alongside education all the way to postgraduate study is something very special. It is an amazing system and is only possible because we link with schools around Cambridge and Comberton Village College, where our large dojo is.”

 Simon Fairhall, Chief Executive of LIVING SPORT, said:

“The evening was a fantastic celebration of community sport and it was great to see so many individuals involved in sport from the entire county come together to recognise the achievements of our winners. I’d particularly like to thank all of the sponsors for their support in helping us deliver another memorable awards ceremony this year.”

Anglia Ruskin sponsored the Sports Performer with a Disability Award, which was won by triathlete Lauren Steadman.

A full list of award recipients is available on the Living Sport Website. http://www.livingsport.co.uk/our-projects/living-sport-sports-awards/2013-winners/

For more information on the judo programme at Anglia Ruskin University please visit www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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Anglia Ruskin Judo

The recent agreement of the university to fund a full-time judo coach post has got me to think more about the structure of the judo programme. It is a pretty large programme now and I have always envisaged it as a circular model where everything is even but now I feel I need to consider it from a more hierarchal perspective. This has also allowed me to consider how many people are currently involved in the judo programme and to consider where gaps are.

Here is how I have seen it previously…..

Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 23.28.24

Now it is more hierarchal in nature…..

Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 23.20.54

Some of these posts are not quite in place yet, for example the new head coach, the 10 postgrad students (currently two but will be 6-8 by Sept.), the two research assistant posts are probably a little way off although our current research assistant who is not a judo specialist is looking into some judo research. The AASE programme also doesn’t start until September (still time to sign up!).

The truth is that four years ago I went into the student union and asked to start a judo club, I new I wanted a holistic judo programme but I never thought it would grow so fast and this has only been possible because the university is so innovative and allows/supports it’s staff to develop their ideas.

From September the university should have roughly the following:

1 x judo programme manager

1 x full-time head coach

2 x assistant coach (one a member of lecturer staff and the other a Japanese visiting scholar)

2 x AASE coaches

15 x full-time athletes (Including those on AASE)

20+ recreational athletes

1 x judo programme administrator

150 kids being taught in our community programme

6-8 post graduate researchers (mainly doing PhDs or MPhils related to judo)

1 x team physiologist (intern)

1 x S&C coach

All of this in four years! Not bad 🙂 If you would like to know more about our judo programme then please have a look at our website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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Some pictures from the last two week block of the European Judo Union L4 coach award

Here are  some pictures from the last block of the European Judo Union Level 4 performance award…..

Guest lecturers included Darren Warner, Neil Adams, Danial Lascau, Deborah Gravenstijn, Maki Tsukada, Ikumi Tanimoto, Mike Stocker (EIS) and the General Secretary of the EJU Envic Galea. Modules taught include performance analysis for judo, physiology for judo, Sports development and talent development pathways.

 

 

There is more information on this course at the Anglia Ruskin University judo pages – http://www.anglia.ac.uk/judo

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Judo Scholarships at Anglia Ruskin

Anglia Ruskin University has confirmed that ten judo players will receive scholarships this year. The players, listed below, are a mix of players who train full-time at the university and players that are part-time students on the European Judo Union level 4 performance coach award.

Seven of the athletes train full-time at the Anglia Ruskin Cambridge campus, two of the the EJU coaching award and one studies at University campus Peterborough.

Name Year Course Results
Michael Stewart 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education Club president, Current BUCS champion u66kg, member of BUCS winning mens team 2011 & 2012
Glenn Miller 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Science Member of BUCS winning mens team 2011 & 2012
Natasha Collins 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education BUCS silver medallist
Matt Kavannagh 1st BA (Hons) Law Current British junior champion
Tara Fitzjohn 1st BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education
Luc Bonnargent 1st BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education
Ronnie Plumb 1st BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education
Danny Williams 2nd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching (European Judo Union) Selected to represent Team GB in London 2012
Adrian Markov 2nd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching (European Judo Union) Current BUCS champion u81kg, member of BUCS winning mens team 2012
Josh Plant 3rd BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching and Physical Education Studies at University college Peterborough. Member of BUCS winning mens team 2011 & 2012

As well as scholarships all players will receive physiological testing, strength and conditioning, access to performance analysis, free gym access and two fighting films judo kits.

Four of these athletes will graduate in 2013 and are currently considering a masters programme led by Anglia Ruskin in partnership with Kanoya university in Japan, they will spend half the academic year at Kanoya and half at Anglia Ruskin, Cambridge.

Anglia Ruskin University also recently announced a research group dedicated to judo research that is linked to the International Association of Judo Researchers and hopes to forge collaborations with other universities around the world to develop judo research.

For more information on the judo programme at Anglia Ruskin, which includes coach education, full-time training, research, performance analysis and more please visit www.anglia.ac.uk/judo or email judo@anglia.ac.uk.

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