Do judo coaches need to know about physiology?

On the next block of the EJU level 4 performance coach award the first year group will study physiology. When I was writing this course I constantly asked myself what do coaches need to know? Based upon my previous experiences as a coach, my academic knowledge and the literature on coaching knowledge I developed the model below, I probably read it somewhere and adapted it or maybe put several things I’d read together, I really can’t remember.

Screen Shot 2013-07-08 at 20.56.32

Image taken from one of my powerpoint lectures

I think coaches can learn a lot from experience and reflection but I also think if they have an underpinning knowledge of the science this reflective process of learning can be much faster and more economical. As you can see in the figure above I have added sources to the types of knowledge a coach needs and the sciences generally come from universities.

When I did my first degree, which was in sports science, I had a biomechanics lecturer who always used to say “you cannot change the laws of the universe” and of course he is correct, for example we cannot change gravity but we can manipulate it’s affect if we understand it, take the fosbery flop for example!

So do judo coaches need to understand physiology? Well just like the “laws of the universe” you cannot change physiology but you can manipulate and you can gain huge advantages. In his speech in the film ‘any given Sunday’ Al Pacino says the game is “all about inches” and “taking the inches”. I think judo is the same, every inch matters and you can gain these performance inches in many ways – technical, tactical, psychological etc but also physiologically.

I am not suggesting coaches should be physiologist but lets be honest – they write the “periodised year plan” and most have no idea about the underlying physiology. In some countries they do, Germany, Russia, China and France for example. So if coaches don’t need to be physiologist how much physiology do they need to know? Well, in my opinion, they need to be able to understand physiological test results and apply them to their year plan, they need to be able to interact with the S&C coaches/doctor/physio etc but most importantly they need to understand the physiological demands of the sport so they can apply them to their mat sessions!

Can you honestly say you fully understand the physiological demands of judo? How much lactate would you expect your players to produce in randori? In shiai? How can you test recovery in the taper? Do you sessions mimic the physiological demands of shiai? How can you improve your athletes recovery?

Here are some pictures of our coaches developing their physiology knowledge so that their players can win their fights inch by inch.

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5 Comments

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5 responses to “Do judo coaches need to know about physiology?

  1. Trevor James

    I have to side with the argument in favour of more physiology in terms of its
    under standing when the body is at rest in order
    to compare with when the metabolic systems are
    to be stressed; the effect this has on function and ultimately
    an Elite performance.
    Finally to what degree of understanding;
    the more the better; otherwise where is the
    breakthrough on terms of new or modified
    regimes for an approach to training to come
    from; copying a method without understanding
    the reason for its application would ultimately
    be useless.

  2. I think different coaches have different strengths, some will be very physiologically minded and some very technical etc I think there has to be a balance and coaches should work to there strengths yet work well with the support team around them.

  3. Luca

    I think Judo coaches already know psihology 🙂 …

  4. Luca

    My ex coach tought me how to play guitar and earn money and he didn’t even know it 🙂

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