Monthly Archives: June 2011

Understanding the demands of Judo part 1…..

Before we can understand the physiological demands of judo we must first understand how researchers develop an understanding of sport.

Understanding the Demands of sport

In order for coaches to be able to train athletes to compete and win in their chosen sport their must be an understanding of the sport in question. The coach must understand the demands of the sport from four perspectives:

  • Physiological demands
  • Technical demands
  • Tactical demands
  • Mental demands

The coaches understanding of technical and tactical demands are developed through experience as a coach and sometimes as an athlete. Further understanding of these demands can be developed through performance analysis in the forms of biomechanics and notation. Various authors have developed coaching knowledge of the technical requirements of their sport including (Palao et al, 2009; Laird & McLeod, 2009, Bruce et al, 2009) others have focussed on the tactical requirements (Costa et al,  2011; da Costa et al,  2010; Remmert, 2003).

Understanding the mental demands of sport is complex. Firstly you have the pressure of the sporting environment and the mental demands this elicits such as anxiety, self-efficacy and concentration. You also have the mental challenges of training that include motivation, determination and ability to set goals. Lastly you have the cognitive ability to deal with complex tasks in a time constrained environment.

Understanding the physiological demands is no less complex and will be the focus of this section. There are four common methods of investigating the physiological demands of sport and each has it merits and pitfalls.

  • Time motion analysis
  • Physiological testing during competition
  • Physiological testing post competition
  • Testing athletes physiological attributes

Each of these is described in table 1.

Table 1: Methods of assessing the physiological demands of sport and their merits and pitfalls.

 

Modern research tends to combine these methods for a more holistic enquiry. Part two will consider the physiological demands of judo.

Bibliography

Bruce, L., Farrow, D., Raynor, A. & May, E. 2009. Notation analysis of skill expertise differences in netball. International Journal of Performance Analysis of Sport. 9, 245‐254.

da Costa, I.T., Garganta, J., Greco, P.J., Mesquita, I. & Seabra, A. 2010. Influence of Relative Age Effects and Quality of Tactical Behaviour in the Performance of Youth Soccer Players. International Journal of Performance Analysis of Sport. 10, 82-97.

Davidson, A. & Trewartha, G. 2008. Understanding the physiological demands of netball: a time-motion investigation. International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport. 8(3), 1-17.

Gustavo Conti Costa G.C., Caetano, R.C.J., Ferreira, N.N., Junqueira, G., Afonso, J., Costa, P. &  Mesquita, I. 2011. Determinants of attack tactics in Youth male elite volleyball. International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport. 11, 96-104.

Laird, P. & Mcleod, K. 2009. Notational analysis of scoring techniques in competitive men’s karate. International Journal of Performance Analysis of Sport. 9, 171-187.

Palao, J.M, Manzanares, P., & Ortega, E. 2009. Techniques used and efficacy of volleyball skills in relation to gender. International Journal of Performance Analysis of Sport. 9, 281‐293.

Remmert, H. 2003. Analysis of Group-Tactical Offensive Behavior in Elite Basketball on the Basis of a Process Orientated Model. European Journal of Sport Science. 3(3): 1-12.

Rudkin, S.T. & O’Donoghue, P. 2008. Time-motion analysis of first-class cricket fielding. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport.11, 604—607.

Spencer, M., Rechichi, C., Lawrence, S., Dawson, B., Bishop, D. & Goodman, C. 2005. Time-motion analysis of elite field hockey during several games in succession: a tournament scenario. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 8(4): 382-391.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Judo club, Coach Education, Coaching Judo, Judo, Women's judo

Scientific support for Histon Football Club

Had an interesting meeting with Histon FC yesterday. Anglia Ruskin University have agreed to provide scientific support to the team. The scientific support will include physiological testing and performance analysis. We may also provide some support in terms of the development of their daily training environment (DTE) and some sort of lifestyle management/mentoring for athletes.

This is an interesting opportunity that I am sure will help to develop our students who will help with the testing and performance analysis as internships.

I always find meeting football clubs very interesting. They have a very different philosophy to Olympic sports and I find it very hard to understand their mentality sometimes. I think working with Histon FC may help develop my understanding a bit more.

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Filed under Anglia Ruskin Sports Coaching & Physical Education degree, Coach Education

UK Coaching Summit Day 2

The first session I was booked in for was with Jon Pett from English Table Tennis, his presentation was titled “Managing changes in coach education” and whilst I was interested in this I decided to move and go to Wendy Patterson’s second presentation of the conference on the legacy of the Vancouver Olympics where she spoke about how they have implemented system change post Vancouver 2010. I was sure no-one would notice me change with so many people there but surely enough John Driscoll of SCUK caught me straight away. Fortunately he let me off as long as I kept it a secret 😉

The presentation was again very good from Wendy, although not as passionate as the day before, and she discussed how they have implemented an effective daily training environment across several sports. This is very interesting for me as I am involved with both Comberton Village College and Anglia Ruskin University on developing their sports systems and the daily training environment is key to this.

Wendy also discussed developing coaches and the complexities of ‘hand off’ where coaches need to pass their athletes into the new system, this is also something I am very interested in. There was also information from NI Sport on how they have worked with Wendy to implement some of these changes in Northern Ireland.

Session two was with Sarah Collings and Jon Woodward from sports coach UK on “engaging with UKCC level 4” and I found this session, which was more of a workshop very interesting. Sitting with people who are implementing UKCC level for across a variety of sports and the complexity (sometimes self imposed) of implementing this.

I am interested in UKCC level 4 and how this might evolve in comparison to the European Judo Union Level 4 and 5 coaching awards we run at Anglia Ruskin. I am convinced there will be some great content on these courses and some NGBs will have very different courses to others but I am also certain of the fact that the strength of our course is it cross-European function and no other sport seems to have looked at this. I feel these other sports will really miss out.

The third session of the day was with Warwick Andrews on the new system for Assessors and verifiers across education, this is causing chaos for the sport, the new system is far from economical and many NGBs have no idea what to do and how they can afford it. I am just glad I already have a PG Cert as this seems to cover it.

The last session of the day was a keynote by Eugene Young on ‘harnessing volunteers’. Eugene works for the Gaelic Athletic Association, which I didn’t really know a lot about but I now know it is huge! His presentation finish the conference well, it was very humorous and pitched well for the audience.

This does make me think of one thing that bothered me throughout the conference though. There were around 250 delegates and these people make serious policy decisions that can have a huge affect on our volunteers. I would like to know how many of them volunteer, not as one offs but weekly, in a club, with their own athletes. I am willing to bet very few. Some may have done it a while ago and now use the same excuse as many of the others – too busy, well so are most of our volunteers!

I think all policy makers in sport should have to volunteer in sports clubs so they can see first hand the impact (good and bad) on volunteers.

Anyway, that’s it until next year, so long Belfast and hello London! Overall a very enjoyable two days.

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UK Coaching Summit part 1

I am currently in sunny Belfast for the UK coaching summit organised by Sports Coach UK.

Before arriving you select which presentations you would like to attend and I have got all of my first choices which I think is pretty good and not common to all conferences I have attended.

The day started with some semi-structured networking. Apparently feedback from last years UK coaching summit was that people would like more time to network. I am not sure doing this first think on the first morning was a great idea, having heard some presentations people might have had more to talk about. Having said that the way the networking was managed was very good and it ended up with everyone meeting at least 10 new people.

There were some keynote lectures about the current position of SCUK and UK sport but there was nothing really noteworthy in these.

My first presentation was by Alex Twitchen for coaching degrees. This was one of the main topics I came here to gain a better understanding of and there were question as answered here that have led me to feel more confident in the endorsement process. I still think it will be tough, but none-the-less achievable. I am attending a meeting with Alex in June about this process.

The second presentation was on blended learning by John Erskine from Staffordshire university. I attend this as three pathways I am involved in use blended learning. This was an interesting presentation and gave me some ideas on how we can develop our courses. I am not sure how many in the audience were convinced of the benefits of blended learning but I have no doubt it is the future of education let alone coach education.

A final keynote for the day was by Wendy Patterson who is the CEO of Pacific sport Vancouver. She spoke about the legacy of the 2010 Winter Olympics and the preparations for the games. Most importantly she focussed upon system alinement. Wendy gave a very good presentation on a subject I am passionate about (Talent Development Environments) but I am going to leave this blog for now and discuss Wendy’s presentation in a later blog.

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